News

What’s New at Literature Studio!

“My Glass of Wine” Creative Writing Contest

Literature Studio and Hawakaal Publishers are very pleased to announce an exciting “My Glass of Wine” contest on the occasion of the launch of Kiriti Sengupta’s book My Glass of Wine. PRIZES UP FOR GRABS: Out of all submissions we receive, we will be shortlisting 5 entries. Those 5 contestants will get a chance to read their work at the launch event of My Glass of Wine on September 18, 2015. One of these participants will be awarded a book deal with Hawakaal Publishers. Two participants will win free creative writing courses worth Rs. 10,000/- each. Two will receive a gift hamper from Tathya. SUBMISSION GUIDELINES Interested candidates are requested to send their entries along with their biographies and profile pictures to info@literaturestudio.in. The entry should be your own unpublished creative work. We are looking for entries that belong to the genre “Hybrid Literature”. Other genres will not be accepted. For more information on “Hybrid Literature”, please scroll to the bottom of this Event The entry should be between 600 to 700 words in length. You can either send the entry in a word document or paste it directly in the body of the email. The subject line of the email should state “MGOW Contest Entry”. Each contestant can submit only one entry. In case someone happens to submit multiple entries, the last one will be considered. Decision of the judges will be final and cannot be contested. The contest is open to citizens of India only. The contest is open only to those who haven’t yet published a book traditionally. DEADLINE: All entries should reach us by September 10, 2015, 11:59pm. SELECTION AND DECISION PROCESS Out of all entries received, our jury will shortlist five. These contestants will then be invited to read / present their entries during the launch event on the 18th. In case, you cannot make it to the event, you can let us know and we will arrange for someone to read your entry. During the event, the winner and the runners-up will be decided on the spot by the members of the panel, in consultation with the publisher. The results will be declared before the end of the event. WHAT IS HYBRID LITERATURE? In simple terms, Hybrid Literature is a piece of writing, short or long, in which the writer breaks free of the boundaries imposed by a single genre. The writer may choose to intersperse prose with poetry, accentuate text with graphic elements, such as photographs, caricatures, etc., or intermingle fact with fiction, and biographies with memoirs. Following are some examples of Hybrid Literature: Example 1:  An excerpt from The Reverse Tree by Kiriti Sengupta. This excerpt marries poetry and prose.  ***** I have been an ardent fan of the poet Sumita Nandy’s works. She is subtle, yet she is strong, and she writes sensuous Bengali poetry. It was with her Desirous Water (that I translated from its Bengali original, Ichemoti) where I could easily sense that she used a male voice in some portions of her poetry. She even confessed that in Ichemoti she wrote like a male, although I have found a mix of both the sexes in the book. Is this what we refer to as a third sex or gender? Here is a poem that I wrote as I read Sumita’s Desirous Water: I have matched my lips with the highs of your water as you flowed joy the sun has dared to surface on your mirror playing both a she, and a he toy I’ve my own equation of love my he throbs in fire while my she is coy my girl shivers...

Read More

Braving the rain for the 2nd meet of Writers’ Circle – Central Delhi Chapter

The 2nd meet of the Writers’ Circle – Central Delhi Chapter was scheduled for Saturday afternoon and it seemed that weather was determined to play spoilsport. It had been raining continuously since the morning, so I decided to start early for the event. I started at 12pm for the 2pm event. It was perhaps the most difficult drive. The rate at which the rain was falling was much higher than the rate at which my car’s windshield wipers were able to wipe off the water. And as a result, I could hardly see anything. It was such a blessing that I didn’t find any traffic jams en route. But I was worried for the participants and wondered whether they would take the pains to step out of their homes in such a weather. I could do nothing but wait and watch. But as the clock struck 2, people started pouring in, and in the end, we had 10 participants excluding me for the event, which wasn’t bad on such a day. I silently applauded the participants for their courage and determination. It was a fun mix once again. We had a tech entrepreneur who is also an artist, an artist who is also a columnist, a columnist who is also an author and businesswoman, a businessman who is also an aspiring writer, an aspiring writer who is also a blogger, a blogger who is also a Hindi poet, and some very talented college students. Each of them had their own unique styles and genres and personalities and that added variety to the readings. There wasn’t a second of boredom. In many ways, the group was very much like the Noida Chapter, especially where Chetan Bhagat is concerned. One mention of his name is enough to cause an uproar in the group and then you can rest assured that you will need to wait it out for at least 10 minutes before you can interrupt and bring the focus back to the readings. So I am planning to add another rule from the next time onwards. Words like “Chetan Bhagat” and “Amish Tripathi” and to some extent “Durjoy Dutta” and “Ravinder Singh” can only be uttered during the break or after the readings are over. They are too much of a distraction. 🙂 The next meet will be held in the first half of August and will be posted on our various platforms. If you want to be a part of this wonderful group, send an email to info@literaturestudio.in....

Read More

Launch of Literature Studio’s Writers’ Circle Central Delhi Chapter || The Perfect Beginning

Literature Studio was to launch the second chapter of its popular initiative Writer’ Circle in Central Delhi on 6 June 2015. The venue was to be the iconic Oxford Bookstore in Connaught Place. It was hard to imagine that things could get better than this. But they did, and it was because of the awesome people who attended it. Literature Studio has been running the Writers’ Circle for the past seven months in Noida and the amount of warmth, camaraderie, and support the group has managed to generate among the members is incredible. Noida chapter has people who write in both Hindi and English, from various age groups, and at various stages of their journeys as writers. This brings a variety to the group and gives the members a chance to learn from each other. After running the Noida chapter successfully for the last 7 months, it was time to take this experience to other parts of the city. The group that attended the first meet of Writers’ Circle – Central DelhiChapter was eight people strong, plus the facilitator, Vibha Malhotra. People from various walks of life had registered and brought with them a depth of experience and a wide variety of writing genres and styles. As a result, the event was full of fun and insights. It is amazing that we had such a brilliant group in our first meet. This is a very encouraging sign. I am already excited about the Central Delhi Chapter, and have goosebumps imagining the heights we can reach after such a wonderful start....

Read More

Literature Studio Summer Scholarship (Season 2) – And here are the winners…

Literature Studio Summer Scholarships were announced for the first time in 2014 and Shreeya Sharma and Shreya Pothula were the winners. Encouraged by the sessions we had with them, we decided to increase the number of scholarships this time. When we announced the Season 2 of Literature Studio Summer Scholarship we weren’t prepared for the sheer quality or the variety of the entries we would be receiving. And as expected, it made judging all the more challenging. But it was a pleasure as always to read evocative short stories, biographical essays, and thought-provoking articles children chose to send in. Congratulations to those who made it to the list. Those who didn’t, please don’t lose heart. All submissions we received this year were of the highest quality and the only factor coming in the way of us awarding you too is the limited number of scholarships. Your writing is precious, and you should be proud of it whether or not you win. And, now, ladies and gentlemen, please put your hands together for the Literature Studio Summer Scholars of 2015: Winners of 100% scholarship (A Creative Writing course worth Rs. 25,000/-)  Aashutosh Mukherjee, a student of class VIII from Delhi, loves to read and likes to try his hand at writing too. He is looking forward to the short story course, as he hopes that this will bring in some discipline in his writing activity. He also looks forward to improving his skill in terms of being able to elaborate on a plot and learning the art of story telling. In his own words: “I will learn to think and express myself under the aegis of Literature Studio.” Lily Sperber is a 15 year old from New York who loves to read, and listen to music. She also enjoys keeping up her Instagram Fanpage, spending time with family and watching TV shows and movies. She is very persistent in accomplishing her goals, and works hard in school. Her main goal is to make a difference in people’s lives, the same way so many have impacted hers. Winners of 50% scholarship (A basic Creative Writing course worth Rs. 12,500/-, with an option to upgrade to the Advanced Course) Meenakshi Sunil is a 15 year old class X student from Wayanad, Kerala, who hopes to one day become a Software Engineer, Creative Writer, and a volunteer for a nongovernmental organization, and also explore the world travelling solo. She is a member of the editorial board of her school magazine and a district level winner in Guitar Western and Carnatic Music. She loves hanging out at Café Coffee Day and eating at KFC and Dominos. Udupi joints are her favorite too. Her favorite books are Diaries of Wimpy Kid, Two States, Malgudi School Days. Tushita Tandon is a 15-year-old student ,studying in class X. She loves to read and spends her spare time writing, which she does a lot a lot. She wishes to go abroad for her higher studies and wants to pursue science in her life ahead. She enjoys dancing and writing poems and short stories. She is her school topper not only in academics but also in co-curricular activities. Congratulations to the winners and we look forward to getting started with the courses. Best, Team at Literature Studio...

Read More

5th Writers’ Circle – Three welcomes, a farewell, and much much more

Yesterday, we had the 5th Writers’ Circle, and what a fantastic evening it was. Apart from the fantastic readings and discussions, this circle was special for several reasons. Three Welcomes: We had three new people joining us this time. Tanvi participated as a reader and the most attentive one at that. Rinku, who is still discovering the writer in her, was there to experience the Circle. We hope to see her pick up her writing instruments and start scribbling away pretty soon. Amitabha, a filmmaker, was there for inspiration, and we do hope we managed to inspire him to some extent. A Farewell: Ninad, a regular member of our group, is leaving the city for what sounds like a long time. Though he will be participating by sending in his stories every month, it won’t be the same as having him here with us. So we organized a small sendoff for him. We wish him the best, and he will be sorely missed. A Film: We watched a short clip of a film by Amitabha, starring Ninad. It was decided that we will watch one whole 40-minute-long film in the next writers’ circle. A Musical Performance: We concluded the day with an awesome flute recital by the very talented Raghav. Now we know where all the soulfulness in his writing comes from. Brilliant writer and now a brilliant musician too. A Brilliant Guest Writer: Vineetha Mokkil, the author of a happy place, joined us for an hour. She shared insights about writing and publishing short stories – the roadblocks, the challenges, and the opportunities. She signed books for the participants while we enjoyed Ninad’s farewell cake. So you can see how our Circle is growing. I wish we stay this way for a long, long time.        ...

Read More

Literature Studio’s 3rd Writers’ Circle || The Next Level

Literature Studio’s 3rd Writers’ Circle || The Next Level

From the time the first Writers’ Circle was organized in December 2014, this group of creative writers has grown considerably. Along with some regular faces, we also see new members join and become a part of the family each month. Each member brings along a unique writing style and a different personality to the Circle and that is the biggest charm of this gathering.   With his ability to capture life realistically Amit Joshi’s Hindi writings inadvertently have people rolling on the floor, laughing. Raghav Arora’s contemplative take on the world makes one wonder where this young chap gets the wisdom clearly beyond his age. Esha Chakraborty’s charming stories and her impeccable story-telling skills have earned her several admirers, so much so that when she wasn’t present in the 3rd Writers’ Circle, she was missed. Arpit’s perseverance and confidence radiates as he graciously accepts feedback and suggestions. The 3rd Writers’ Circle saw several writers and readers in attendance for the first time. Ninad Parikh’s thoughful, introspective stories were the perfect way to begin the session.  Kathryn Brettel read out of the manuscript that she completed recently and is now looking for publishers. Her instinctive writing and unassuming, humble personality left a lasting impression on everyone present. Gaurav Dhawan left a mark with his fiery criticism. The short blog post that Satyendra Ranjan shared rang true with several listeners. Sahil’s quiet presence and relevant remarks were very well received. Ritvan Pande’s extraordinary quips spiced up the evening. Ashmi Ahluwalia’s soft, evocative poetry touched everyone at some level, while Parvathi’s interesting observations and questions made a huge difference as well. With 12 people attending the 3rd Writers’ Circle it is time we start thinking of the next steps. Starting from the 4th Writers’ Circle on 28th of March, there will be some rules and regulations in place to ensure that the quality of criticism and discussions stays high. We will be reading out the following rules before writers start reading their works: Ensure that your comments are helpful. Criticism for the sake of criticism will not be tolerated. You are welcome to share your feedback about the writing, but not the writer and his or her capabilities. Blanket comments, such as “Language can be better”, need to be accompanied with specific examples. While you are giving your feedback, if the moderator says “cut”, you cannot continue with that particular point anymore. You are welcome to share a different feedback though. Flouting of any of these rules can result in expulsion from the Circle and may also result in a lifetime ban from the future circles. We have also started thinking of ways to make the circle available to more people. We will be sharing more about this soon. In the meanwhile, if anyone has any ideas, please feel free to share. Thanks, Vibha...

Read More
badge