Posts made in April, 2014

Announcing Literature Studio Summer Scholarship

One cannot choose what talents our children will be born with, but one can definitely help give the talent the right direction. Providing quality mentorship and training is the key, and no one can deny that candid feedback and timely hand-holding can do wonders to a child’s skills. And you make this possible for your child by having him or her apply for Literature Studio Summer Scholarship. Is my child eligible? If your child meets the following criteria, he or she is eligible: 1) The child is 11-17 years old 2) The child has demonstrated talent for writing How does one apply? To apply for the summer scholarship, send in the following to info@literaturestudio.in by 15th May 2014: 1) A sample of your child’s writing (600-700 words, fiction or non-fiction) 2) A covering note stating why you think your child should receive this scholarship What happens next? Our jury will go through the applications received and will identify one candidate to receive the Literature Studio Summer Scholarship. And that one candidate could be your child. And, of course, what does it mean for my child if he or she receives the scholarship? The child will get Rs. 20,000/- worth of Creative Writing mentorship absolutely free. The child can choose between fiction and non-fiction. The classes will be held in June during the summer vacations....

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Exploring a Writer’s World || In conversation with Jeet Thayil

Exploring a Writer’s World || In conversation with Jeet Thayil

Right from its conception, Literature Studio has laid great emphasis on interactions amongst writers. There’s so much we can learn from each other, and when that “other” is poet, writer, and musician Jeet Thayil, whose debut novel Narcopolis was nominated for the Man Booker Prize 2012 and the Man Asian Prize and won the 2013 DSC Prize for South Asian Literature, then a brief conversation can uncover a treasure trove of rich insights. More so because even though Narcopolis, which has since been translated into five languages, is his first novel, Jeet has been writing poetry since adolescence. He has published four collections of poetry and is greatly admired for his attention to form. He is also a songwriter, a singer, and a guitarist and manages to keep himself very busy doing what he likes to do. And one day, on a pleasant afternoon of March 2014, I found myself standing outside his home in South Delhi. I had managed to reach on time and was let in by a warm and welcoming Jeet. He offered me a cup of coffee and we were soon chatting about all things relevant to writers. While capturing our discussion in this post, I have tried to hold on to each and every word he said and be as accurate as possible. And now, without digressing too much, here is what we talked about: Vibha: The world knows Jeet Thayil as a performance poet, a writer, and a musician. How would you introduce yourself to the readers of Literature Studio’s blog? Jeet: I think of myself as a working man. I work every day. Some days I work on music, some days I work on poetry, and some days I work on prose. That’s really all there is to it. In my mind I don’t differentiate between the various genres. I just think of it as what I do. Work! Vibha: And how do you decide that today you are going to work on music or on poetry or on prose. Is it mood-driven or deadline-driven? Jeet: It’s very much deadline-driven. The only thing that’s mood-driven is a poem, or a song. If something occurs to me – a melody – and if I am doing something else, I record it right away. Later I’ll work on lyrics and shape. But everything else is deadline driven. Vibha: That is true for a lot of us. I almost always end up doing things at the very last minute. Jeet: I am a firm believer in the last minute. Vibha: Your productivity is the highest at that time. Jeet: And you don’t over-think it, and you are often very creative, because you have to be. Vibha: You are pushed… Jeet: You are pushed. Your back is against the wall. Vibha: True! But in usual scenarios, what inspires you to write? Jeet: I think what usually inspires me to write is anxiety. I just get worried that I am not doing anything, and when that builds up, I get down to work. I wish I could say that I am inspired by a sunset. But if I see a beautiful sunset, I just look at it. I like to enjoy it and not worry about translating it into deathless prose. Vibha: Yes, and I feel that we are too busy capturing things. You see everyone trying to click pictures of everything they come across, but you hardly see anyone just sitting and enjoying the view. Jeet: You are so busy trying to record it, that you miss it. You miss the experience. Vibha: So true! But...

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